What’s your learning style?

Each one of us has a preference for a learning style. For example, you may process and remember information better if you listen to Learning stylesthem, while a friend of yours has to read them to get the same results.
Researchers have come up with different models of learning styles. One of the most common is Neil Fleming’s model that divides learning styles into visual, auditory, kinesthetic and verbal.

LEARNING STYLES – NEIL FLEMING’S MODEL

VISUAL

You find it easier to process information that you see such as graphs, pictures and tables.

AUDITORY

You find it easier to retain information through hearing. For example, you prefer audiobooks to traditional books.

KINESTHETIC

You find it easier to learn something by doing, by experience. You prefer doing a practical experiment than a verbal explanation of it.

VERBAL

You find it easier to process written words.

Despite the existence of different types of learning style models, it’s important to bring in mind that only few people do fall into just one specific learning style. Indeed, the majority of people uses a combination of different learning styles to process information. However, even in this case they do have at least a predominant learning style. In short you may have a strong preference for a visual learning style but you may also have some skills, for example, for an auditory learning style.

Knowing your learning style allows you to maximize the time you spend studying choosing the method that suits you best.
Let’s now see what you can do to take the best of each learning style:

VISUAL

  • Turn notes into concept maps, pictures, graphs etc.
  • Avoid visual distractions such as television, windows, etc.
  • Use the same color to highlight similar concepts.
  • Study vocabulary using images.

AUDITORY

  • Listen to videos, audiobooks or lectures.
  • Prefer study groups where everyone repeats lessons or shares his/her doubts out loud.
  • When learning new vocabulary use rhymes or set it to a jingle to ease learning

KINESTHETIC

  • Learn new material while using objects or performing actions.
  • Use role-playing, games, or projects to learn new material.

VERBAL

  • Make lists to learn new vocabulary.
  • Take notes; you can also rewrite them in your own words.
  • Self-study, reading or taking written exercises.

 

You can test your predominant learning style with this questionnaire.
What’s your results? What’s your predominant learning style?

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