Let’s learn Italian slang

Let’s learn Italian slang

On books you usually learn standard Italian, it’s easier and it allows you to talk with everyone in Italy without problems. However, if you’ve visited Italy often, you may have noticed that in every Italian region you go, slang is also used. Italian slang can be difficult even for Italians because it can change from region to region. So, knowing Italian slang can be useful if you decide to spend more than a month in Italy. Today you’re going to learn Italian slang, just a few words, don’t worry. 1. Bordello If in standard Italian bordello means brothel, in Italian…

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How to sound like a native using allora and dai

How to sound like a native using allora and dai

Who, among language learners, doesn’t want to sound like a native? One of the ways to do this is to start using words and expressions Italians use everyday. Allora and dai are two Italian words that are widely used in Italy. So, learning how to use them properly can help you sound like a native. DAI I’m sure you’ve already seen this Italian word somewhere in your Italian books. One of the first things you learn about the word dai is that it’s the second singular person of the present tense of the verb dare – to give. Ex: Mamma,…

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Difference between bene and buono in Italian

Difference between bene and buono in Italian

Many people who learn Italian are usually confused about the use, and meaning, of the Italian words bene and buono. So, today I’m going to explain to you when and how to used bene and buono. BENE Let’s start with some grammar. What? You already see a headache coming? I know, Italian grammar can be complicated but just give me a minute and you’ll se that, in this case, it’s easier than you thought. Bene in Italian is an adverb. This means that it says something about a verb, describing actions and states. Let’s look at two examples: a. In…

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Italian connecting words – Dunque, quindi, and perciò

Italian connecting words

Knowing how to use the right linking word in Italian can help you both speak and write more easily, and organize your conversations logically. Some time ago, I talked about how to use the Italian connecting words insomma, and allora. Today, I’d like to explain how the Italian connecting words dunque, quindi, and perciò are used. DUNQUE Dunque can be used in many different ways in Italian. 1. Dunque can be used to express a consequence, a deduction or a conclusion. Ex: Questa casa è enorme e dunque è più adatta a una famiglia This house is huge, so it’s…

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Italian linking words – Insomma, and allora

Italian linking words – Insomma, and allora

Linking words are those words that show how two or more ideas or sentences are related to one another. So, they are used to join clauses, sentences and paragraphs. Linking words are essential to express concepts logically. That’s why today I’ll tell you how to use some Italian linking words correctly. 1. Insomma Insomma is the first of the five Italian linking words of today’s list. Insomma can be used in many different ways in Italian. It can be used to conclude or sum up something you were saying. Ex: Le alte temperature stanno sciogliendo i ghiacciai, senza considerare che…

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